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Outreach Programs

Outreach Programs

Bring the Museum & Aquarium to your school or organization! Here you can learn about our programs, submit an inquiry form, and meet our Animal Ambassadors. We have several outreach programs to suit your educational focus and age group. We are also happy work with you to adjust our programming to meet your age group or theme requirements.

COMING SOON! Sky Hunters

Look to the sky as we learn about raptors and how their hunting skills have earned them the title of “birds of prey.” This up close experience threads in conservation messaging while meeting live raptors!

NEW! Available Summer 2021 - Tails and Tales (All Ages)

Why do some animals have tails and what do they do with them? Discover how animals use their tails and other adaptations by meeting a few live animals up close. We’ll also share some animal tales along the way!

Ocean Odyssey (Mobile Touch Tank) (All Ages)

Our traveling touch tank brings live ocean animals to you!  Break down common misconceptions surrounding sharks and rays, as we highlight the unique adaptations these animals have to survive. The program will also allow participants to explore the important roles sharks and rays play in the ecosystem, learn how the actions of people in the landlocked Tri-State area impact sharks and rays that live thousands of miles away, and discover how people can help protect them. Afterwards, participants may get their hands wet and touch some of these animals.

Please select a shark program or ray program when booking.

Possible Next Generation Science Standards met through this program:

  • 3-LS4-3 Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
  • 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Mississippi River Life (Grades K-5)

Mussels, snakes and beavers; each species has a niche or role in the environment. Through the use of pelts and other hands-on items, participants will explore animals that call the Mississippi River home! 

  • This program will include one or two live animals.

Possible Next Generation Science Standards met through this program:

  • 4-LS1-1. Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • 5-LS1-1. Support an argument that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water.

Rockin' Reptiles & Awesome Amphibians (Grades K-6)

Become a herpetologist and explore the world of reptiles and amphibians! Learn about some of their amazing adaptations and the important roles they play in nature. A few live animals will stop by to help us learn!

  • This program will include multiple live animals.

Possible Next Generation Science Standards met through this program:

  • K-LS1-1. Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
  • 2-LS4-1. Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.
  • 3-LS4-3. Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Invertebrates - The Life of a Bug (Grades K-3)

Invertebrates, or animals without a backbone, are the most common type of animal on the planet. Learn about some of their amazing adaptations while meeting a few live animals up close and personal!

  • This program will include one or two live animals.

Possible Next Generation Science Standards or Iowa Math Standards met through this program:

  • K.MD.A.2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/”less of” the attribute, and describe the difference.
  • 2-LS4-1. Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.
  • 3-LS4-3. Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Furs-n-Lead: The Life of a Voyageur Along the Mississippi (Grades 4-8)

A voyageur’s life was one of travel and trade as they encountered Native American peoples and wildlife species along the Upper Mississippi River. Examine the role that furs and lead played in the lives of these historic individuals, including our city’s namesake, Julien Dubuque.

Possible Iowa Social Studies Standards met through this program:

  • SS.4.18 Describe how environmental and cultural characteristics influence population distribution in specific places or regions.
  • SS.6.20 Analyze connections among historical events and develoments in various geographic and cultural contexts.

An Animal Chorus (Grades K-3)

Croak, buzz, chirp and sing -Nature has many sounds if you listen closely. Explore different ways animals communicate with each other. Transform into an animal chorus and meet live animals up close!

Possible Next Generation Science Standards met through this program:

  • 2-LS4-1 Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.
  • 3-LS3-2 Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.

Pioneer Living (Grades 1-4)

Pioneers were the first people to settle an area. Explore what daily life was like for children in the 1800’s through hands-on chores and games. Roll-up your sleeves and help us churn butter or grind corn. We will wrap up by playing etiquette games!

Possible Iowa Social Studies Standards met through this program:

  • SS1.21 Compare life in the past to life today within different communities and cultural groups.
  • SS.4.25 Analyze the impact of technological changes in Iowa, across time and place.

Pollution Solutions (Grades 6-8)

Do you know how your actions affect the overall health of the Mississippi River? Students will use a watershed model (enviroscape) to investigate how pollutants move in a landscape. Taking that information, students will work in small groups to turn everyday objects into a tool for improving the water quality of their lake model.

Possible Next Generation Science Standards met through this program:

  • MS-LS2-5. Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.
  • MS-ESS3-3. Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

River Commerce, Culture, Conservation & Careers (Grades 3-6)

                                  

RiverWorks Discovery® educates communities about the commerce, culture, conservation, and careers of the great rivers of America and their watersheds. During this presentation, students will learn about life on the river, using hands-on materials, to explore how communities have developed with navigation, trade, and travel.

Possible Iowa Social Studies Standards met through this program:

SS.3.13. Identify how people use natural resources, human resources, and physical capital to produce goods and services.

SS.5.13. Describe how goods and services are produced and distributed domestically and globally.

SS.6.20. Analyze connections among historical events and developments in various geographic and cultural contexts.

 

Outreach programs are typically one hour in length. Price breaks are available for multiple sessions of the same program. For pricing details, availability, and reservations, please contact Missy Wersinger at mwersinger@rivermuseum.com.

 

Inquiry Form

Interested in booking? Complete the following, and we'll contact you within the next few days!

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Meet Our Animal Ambassadors

LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE SPECIEs here   
Sugar
Our resident Cane Toad's name is a reference to the sugar cane fields they were imported to. Now the animal is considered an invasive species.

Maize
Our Gray Corn Snake is named for its markings and its tendency to be found in agricultural fields.

Copper
Our Orange Corn Snake is not venemous; however, it gets its name from the Copperhead Snake it is often mistaken for.

Blue and Orion
Blue is named for the blue glow emenating from the Emperor Scorpion under fluorescent light. And Orion's name comes from Greek mythology, where Orion the hunter was killed by Scorpio. The story highlights a few misconceptions associated with scorpions.

Moss and Grumble
Our female and male Giant Geckos are named for their camoflague abilities and the vocalizations they use to communicate.

Digger
The Gopher Tortoise is named for the burrows it digs that become valuable homes to many other animals.

Savannah
Our Kenyan Sand Boa is named for the habitat where it is found.

Sierra
The Mexican Red-Kneed Tarantula is a native to the scrubland along western faces of the Sierra Madre Occidental and Sierra Madre del Sur mountain ranges in Mexico.

Tucker
Tucker the Reimann's Turtle is named for his ability to tuck his head alongside its body for protection.

Rocky
The Uromastyx is found in rocky outcrops in the Sarahan Desert. 

learn more about these species here

Delphi
Named for Greek mythology, our Ball Python was named after the story of a python that guarded the oracle at Delphi.

Capillus
The Bearded Dragon is named for his, you guessed it, beard. Capillus is the latin translation for beard.

Dune & Hope
Dune is a reference to the sand dunes in which the Diamondback Terrapin lays its eggs, and Hope is a reference to one of the most famous diamonds , the shape of which gives this animal its name.

Striker
The Ornate Horned Frog is an ambush predator, providing the perfect name (Striker) for this ambassador.

Scarlet
The Red Eared Slider gets both of its names for the red spots on its head.
 

learn more about these species here

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